Rotunda

Rotundas are around buildings or rooms, sometimes with a domed roof. The word “rotunda” has its origins in the Latin word “rotonda,” meaning “around”; those structures became popular in medieval Central Europe. Curves in structure consistently require just angled cuts and additional materials and technology, so these major feats of structure were initially utilized in churches, libraries, government buildings, museums and halls as showpieces.

Siemasko + Verbridge

Rotundas have cylindrical walls and most commonly a domed roof. Dormers are bumped into the domed ceiling of the rotunda to let light in.

Deep River Partners

Cove lights circle the dome of the rotunda, and pin lights create a starry-sky effect.

Colleen Brett

A semicircular domed or vaulted space off a main structure of a building is known as an apse. Apses are seen in churches.

Christopher D. Marshall Architect

Although the ceiling is not domed, this room can nevertheless be thought of as a rotunda since the walls are somewhat cylindrical.

Neuhaus Design Architecture, P.C.

This rotunda has a metal domed roof that is comparable to an onion roof.

omnidome

These duplex homes wouldn’t be known as rotundas, since the walls aren’t cylindrical; they’re spherical.

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Architecture Shows a Portal Frame of Mind

As I navigate through the thousands of photographs on , I tend to detect certain formal trends. One in the modernist vein is what I’m calling portals. These are exterior elements — walls, floors, roofs — which stretch past the exterior wall to create profound frames. The reasons for this saying are diverse, but they come down to a couple aims: framing a particular perspective, providing shade and cover or making a statement.

QUADRANTE Arquitectura

This portal site for this villa in Portugal serves as a patio in front of a louvered glass wall. The superminimal saying of the whole design means the portal reads as a dark rectangle among the white walls.

PAUL CREMOUX studio

This beach house in Mexico uses a portal site on the upper floor; the cantilevered volume produces a covered terrace under it.

PAUL CREMOUX studio

The notch that is cut to the side wall generates a panoramic view from the interior, rather than a more directional view that would arise from wholly solid walls.

Make Architecture

Here is a portal site that is inserted into an existing house as a portion of its redesign. The central place and its materials make it stand out.

Make Architecture

Up close we can observe that it serves the dining area. A sliding glass wall nicely extends this space to the exterior.

Make Architecture

From indoors, looking vertical to the portal, the timber walls seem to cut most of the way throughout the house, notched for passage and perspectives. The substance stands out indoors as well as outside, marking a significant area in the house.

DuChateau Floors

This example comprises two portals vertical to each other: a big, one small, every facing the pool.

DuChateau Floors

The little portal serves as the bedroom and can be perfectly matched with the water. The sides are solid, and the opening is totally transparent — a sliding glass wall bisected at the center.

DuChateau Floors

The huge portal (the length is big enough to require an extra column) serves the living area. A sliding glass wall unites the indoors and the patio overlooking the pool. 1 side comprising a fireplace is cut,.

DuChateau Floors

This shot shows the greatest appeal of eyeglasses in general: exterior spaces which are embracing, shaded and elastic. It’s simple to observe the patio utilized for dining and other uses.

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Daring Cantilevers: Architecture Takes Flight

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Eames on Film: The Architect and The Painter

Contemporary furniture fans would be hard-pressed to come across a stronger and innovative set of 20th-century designers than Charles and Ray Eames. Although they were often believed to be brothersthey had been a husband-and-wife group, now best known for their iconic line of seats for Herman Miller, also experts on just about any kind of art form. “Charles wasn’t an architect trying to do architecture, or a furniture designer trying to make furniture,” says film producer Bill Jersey. “He Ray were two people who had been hoping to get us to see the world differently.”

When manufacturer Jason Cohn approached Jersey to help him produce a movie on Ray and Charles Eames, Jersey didn’t know much about the couple. “Charles Eames always said he didn’t sell his expertise to clients — he offered his ignorance,” states Jersey. “Exactly the same was true for me with all this particular movie.” As they learned about the few, they understood there was literature in their work, but very little on Charles and Ray as individuals.

Premiere: Eames: The Architect and The Painter aired Dec. 19, 2011 on American Masters. A DVD premiered Tues., Dec. 13, 2011

Interestingly, Cohn’s debut to Charles and Ray Eames was through their films, not their iconic furniture. While in film school, he was given a box set of the experimental movies. “They’re so odd and esoteric, I knew I had to find out more about them,” he states. “The pictures in these pictures stuck for quite a while.”

Film had always been a passion for both Ray and Charles, and they often experimented with films in their workplace. In 1968, they gained nationwide attention with their educational movie, Powers of Ten. Following that, they were quickly hired by the United States Government, IBM, and other large corporations for exhibitions and accompanying movies.

Eames: The Architect and the Painter is the first complete movie about Charles and Ray since their deaths, just 10 decades apart, in 1978 and 1988. “Film is more of a psychological realm than a sensible one,” says Cohn. “We believed it’d be the ideal medium to explore the Eames’s personalities.” “We didn’t necessarily want it to be informative,” states Jersey. “We wanted people to watch the movie and say’wow’.”

During the movie, the viewer is instantly drawn to the exceptional charm of the Eames — especially Charles, who is repeatedly described by former co-workers as charismatic. Despite the charisma that appeared to detract from them equally, there were still facets of their working life that triggered challenges, especially for Ray. A number of the people who they talked to nearly viewed Ray and Charles as saints — but Jersey and Cohn wished to paint a more exact image. “It’s not really a question of exactly what material you want to add, but in case you must,” states Jersey.

Jersey and Cohn invest a lot of time exploring the whimsical home Ray and Charles constructed for themselves in Pacific Palisades, Calif. (pictured), and their charming office at 901 Washington Boulevard in Venice Beach. The twosome created unique sets to their lives, installing massive pieces of artwork on the ceiling, inventing gigantic toys to put in their workplace, and always changing everything about. 1 former Eames employee clarifies their workplace as”Disneyland for adults”

Right off the bat, it is clear that Ray and Charles were compulsive, artistic people, and often assumed others were the same. “People we interviewed could talk about how Ray will be walking down the street and just begin shrieking in delight with an item she watched,” says Cohn. “She had a true childlike appreciation for life”

In life, Ray was often overshadowed by Charles, so the manufacturers made sure to provide Ray her fair share of credit in the movie. Jersey and Cohn agree that largely because of the biases of the era, Charles was the surface of the Eames Office. “But our study convinced us that the Eames Office would not have been the same without her,” says Cohn.

“I am not a design historian, aficionado, or furniture geek,” says Cohn. “But my biggest takeaway in terms of layout is the fact that it is not a shallow thing. It’s not a coating gloss you wear a item. When it is practiced correctly, it is about problem solving at a profound level.”

“For me, looking at furniture has been sort of like taking a look at the engine of a vehicle,” states Jersey. “I knew what all of the components did, but I didn’t care about how it was created. Today I can see all the small nuances and thoughts that enter it.”

There is a true comparison in the way that the Eames made their furniture and the way many mass-produced products are created now. Their furniture, films, and artwork were designed with love and created with morality and ethics in mind. “High-quality items and images and items can bring joy, especially when made by joyful people,” Cohn says. “Poor items made by unhappy people do not do that.”

All photographs: Copyright 2011 Eames Office LLC, courtesy of Larsen Associates

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Modern Icons: Eames Shell Chair
Modern Icon: Eames Molded Plywood Chair
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